TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

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As a recipient of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Distinguished Teaching Award for Inclusive Excellence and a pedagogical leader on campus, I place a premium on fostering students’ ability to understand how racial, gendered, sexual, and other axes of difference intersect in their lives and in the lives of others. I achieve this goal by foregrounding project-based research, peer review, small group discussions, “reflection papers,” and writing-intensive instruction in the classroom. Interdisciplinary learning is equally central to my classes all of which expose students to seminal texts and theoretical approaches in gender and women’s studies, African American studies, and political theory. My ultimate aim is to develop students’ critical thinking skills in ways that enable them to discern and craft their own unique intellectual and activist projects.

COURSES

University of Wisconsin

Black Feminisms (undergraduate lecture/discussion)

Intersectionality (upper-level undergraduate and graduate seminar)

African American Political Thought (undergraduate lecture/discussion)

Contemporary Feminist Theories (undergraduate lecture/discussion)

Feminist Political Theory (graduate seminar)

University of Chicago

        Problems in the Study of Gender (undergraduate seminar)

        B.A. Honors Essay/Seminar (undergraduate seminar)

        Research Methods in Gender Studies (undergraduate seminar)

PEDAGOGICAL TRAINING AND LEARNING

Participant, The Discussion Project, School of Education, UW-Madison

Co-Facilitator, Graduate Student Training and Pedagogy Workshop, Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, UW-Madison

Participant, Annual Teaching & Learning Symposium, UW-Madison

Moderator, Transformations in the Field: At the Intersections of Research, Teaching, and Activism, American Political Science Association Short Course on Social Justice and the Ethics of Engaged Scholarship